Off Topic – Let’s Talk Tech…

Deep in my soul beats the heart of a Luddite (link below). Because of this, I am not an early adopter of tech gadgets. When I take my annual motorcycle trip up to the mountains, I use an analog GPS. It’s called a paper map. When I do actually purchase technology – say, a laptop computer – it’s usually a bargain basement model that gets the job done but with little in the way of gadgetry frills. This means I get software leftovers. Windows ME and Vista? Yup, run ‘em both for years. I’m still running Vista.

As for cell phones, I used stupid models long after the iPhone came out. Android? Pah-lease. And what’s with these damned tablets? I pretty much ignored cell phone and mobile device technology. I only started texting seriously about two years ago. I talk briefly and text often. I can count on one hand the number of photos I’ve actually taken with my various cell phones.

There’s a serious irony at work here. My profession is in technology. I work with serious tech dorks and I have done this for decades. I even worked with the pioneers of agile programming. But that’s my job, not how I live my life in terms of tech at a firm known for some seriously cutting edge software. They were all arrogant nerds…”I can code Java, I can do anything”, that sort of thing. I hate nerds.

My existing stupid phone was over two years old and it was getting difficult. It shut off by itself at bad times and some of those wee buttons weren’t working as planned. It was time for an upgrade. While I’m not a huge fan of AT & T, it’s what I have and it’s what I’m sticking with. I was snooping around AT & T’s website for a potential upgrade, I found something for 10 bucks that I couldn’t pass up – Samsung Galaxy SII Skyrocket, refurbished.

A few days later the phone showed up at my place of work. I did the SIM card shuffle at the local AT & T store and got the thing activated. Wow. Welcome to the 21st century. This thing is quite amazing. As I’m not qualified to do a review because of my Luddite status, there will be no review. There are better reviews (link below).

I’ve done some interesting research into the future of mobile devices because of my newly-found knowledge of my own personal smart phone. Here are some obvious (to you) predictions:

1. There will be two categories of tech users: Content creators and content consumers.

2. There will be two categories of tech devices: Content input and content display.

3. For content consumers, the desktop and laptop computers are dead, the mobile device will replace them.

4. For creators of basic content (mostly text), a mobile device will soon suffice because the mobile device OS can (or will) support keyboard and mouse input displayed on a full-sized monitor.

5. All our data will belong to the cloud – causing major security and privacy issues.

6. The executives at Microsoft will be quietly submitting resumes to Apple and Google.

I do not mention video games because such things do not hold much relevance for me, Angry Birds not withstanding. I also don’t mention specialized content creation such as professional-quality videos and the like. That’s highly specialized content-creation and most often beyond the range of mere bloggers, like me.

I find it astonishing that mobile devices have so much processing horsepower. Quad-core processors are soon to be introduced (Samsung Galaxy S III) and the latest version of the Andriod OS is trickling out to upgrade existing mobile devices as appropriate. And what does all this mean relative to the Manosphere? Mobile Pinterest. Seriously.

Luddites

Samsung Galaxy SII Skyrocket Review

 

About these ads
  1. #1 by lemmiwinks on May 24, 2012 - 7:25 PM

    I’m one of those nerds, I can code in Java or anything but when I leave work I’m a luddite myself. All my cheap phone (4 years old now) can do is make calls and text. I’ll be damned before I buy an iphone and have a computer with me wherever I go. The only thing I use my home laptop for at home is downloading movies and music.

    I disagree a bit with your predictions though. I know quite a few companies still using old school cobol systems and such, inertia and budget being the main factors on not doing anything about it. Some data will go to the cloud but I think we are a long ways away from all.

    • #2 by P Ray on May 25, 2012 - 12:56 AM

      They use the old COBOL systems because upgrading them is something they have little confidence in because they may have even lost the source code — or they’re afraid others may discover how their system works and come up with something they can market to others.
      The banking industry is filled with people who are good with money and stupid about other things.
      Cloud computing is a return to the days of the dumb terminals.
      Means nothing unless you can sue the host for losing data.
      Until then it’s exporting your data to someone who “promises” to take care of it (Amazon S3, Sony network, Australia had an ISP screw up, GMail)…

  2. #3 by NMH on May 24, 2012 - 8:11 PM

    Bought my 2000 computer with windows ME and owned used it for 12 years with a phone modem. That keeps the IP address trackers at bay.

    Finally bought a new computer this year.

    I dont own a cell phone.

    I work in a technological field but I think personal technology is a time waster for the most part.

  3. #4 by Inlone on May 24, 2012 - 11:17 PM

    It’s mostly a generational thing. You’re around 50 aren’t you?

  4. #5 by LostSailor on May 25, 2012 - 7:56 AM

    I’ve worked in a content creation industry for 25 years. Started using computers before people were using computers in the late 80s (Kaypro 4 anyone?) and gradually over the years, my jobs have morphed from content creation to the tech behind content delivery. But I, too, have resisted adopting tech in my personal life. I resisted getting a cell phone for years. I used to joke when the ex kept insisting I get one that she just wanted to use it as an “electronic leash.” My home computer is 10 years old. Don’t have a laptop. But I did get a smart phone (motorola droid on Verizon–usually a solid signal and connection) and I do like it.

    But TPM is quite right, change is coming. Over the last 6 months or so, I’ve seen a couple of demonstrations of what’s being planned for so-called “smart TV.” Insiders like to call it “convergent content” rather than TV, because, essentially, your TV isn’t going to be a TV. Sony, Samsung, and LG have been working on integrating systems that will combine all your digital content–TV, streaming movies, music, social networking, even books–into one network that will be available on any device: mobile phone, tablet, computer, or TV. Essentially your next TV will not really be a TV, just another screen in your life, like any other screen. They are now working on the middle-man, trying to line up agreements with the cable, wireless, and phone providers as well as beating the bushes to get content providers on board. Yes it will be in the cloud. And yes there will be privacy issues, but, let’s face it, you really only have the illusion of privacy unless you completely unplug and go off the grid.

    But, of course, the real question is how will the facilitate men reeling in more hot chicks…?

  5. #6 by Random Angeleno on May 25, 2012 - 10:33 AM

    Another IT shark on the job who has some stuff at home but decidedly not on the cutting edge. Old Dell laptop resuscitated with Linux, now it’s fine for trading, why bother with a new one? Old desktop still running Windows XP … it’s getting long in the tooth, but still very usable. Had to replace the hard disks on both, but no other plans to upgrade either one.

  6. #7 by NMH on May 25, 2012 - 11:06 AM

    Wimminz need to stop texting and jack-jawing on cell phones and start doing squats, damn it,. Fuck technology.

  7. #8 by R. on May 25, 2012 - 12:53 PM

    Actually, Microsoft is being really intelligent lately. They have invested in different fields, and they have some good results to show. They are very good at gaming, they are willing to completely review their Windows layout and usage (see Windows 8), the Windows Phone system is gorgeous and fast (check out the reviews) and they have done smart stuff in the development field, even creating stuff and publishing as a ECMA standard (so you can copy its behavior if you want).

    I am pretty sure they are not going away that fast.

  8. #9 by Angeline on May 25, 2012 - 10:39 PM

    I am a drafter (commercial construction) and have been for over 20 years. While searching for an answer to a work problem, I stumbled across a phone app that will let me look at, orbit, manipulate, add GPS locations, and markup 3D drawings on my phone, drawings that when I first started in this biz would take 10-15 minutes to load up on the (then state of the art) 8086 desktop monster. It is amazing. And would have really been handy when I was doing field surveying of buildings.

  9. #10 by Aurini on May 27, 2012 - 12:44 PM

    I love repairing engines and putting together Linux boxes, but I hate all the new, shiny garbage they’re marketing everywhere.

    That said – I got my first smart phone a couple months back, and I’m in love with the damned thing. It’s bloody amazing how it keeps track of all my communications, I have the net wherever I go, and if I ever figure out how to install apps, it’ll probably do other cool stuff too.

    That insight into the difference between creators and consumers – I’m hopelessly a creator – is very insightful.

  1. Linkage is Good for You: Week of May 27, 2012

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,501 other followers

%d bloggers like this: